The Pitchfork Disney

Belt Up (Nothing to see/Hear) has staged a nightmarish play. The Pitchfork Disney by Philip Ridely delves into a myriad of human fears. From juvenile qualms of wild dogs and strangers in pursuit, to darker worries of sexual abuse and murder, this play was not for the faint hearted

Production: The Pitchfork Disney

Venue: Drama Barn

Rating: ****

Belt Up (Nothing to see/Hear) has  staged a nightmarish play. The Pitchfork Disney by Philip Ridely delves into a myriad of human fears. From juvenile qualms of wild dogs and strangers in pursuit, to darker worries of sexual abuse and murder, this play was not for the faint hearted.

The Drama Barn was transformed into a dingy home of Presley and Haley Stray. Chocolate wrappers strewn everywhere. The Stray twins live off memories and chocolate, possessing an incredible innocence and sharing fears typical to all children. Only they are not children, they are 28.

Cosmo Disney, played by Spencer Elliot, is peculiarly confident and immaculate, the antithesis of the Strays. When Presley welcomes Cosmo into the dirty home, the twins’ worst fears become reality.

The intuitive direction of Dominic Allen, brought a difficult script to life. Lucy Farrett was enthralling as Haley, achieving an incredible childlike physicality. Marcus Emerton’s uncanny intonations, in his role as Presley, flawlessly transformed a young man into a child.

Tom Ellis embodied fear in the final scenes as Pitchfork. Mute and stumbling, imprisoned in his costume, he presented a terrifying image.

Moments of perfectly timed comedy offer breaks within the tension. It was a fascinating and challenging script staged in an innovative fashion. However, this is not light entertainment.