Georgina Hill

Science Editor (2015/16)

Georgina has written 31 articles for Nouse

Business plus politics equals science: The underworld of regenerative medicine

Science is big business. Johnson & Johnson the pharmaceutical and cosmetics giant is worth trillions of pounds. Another, GlaxoSmithKline, owning…

Update: COP 21 Paris Climate talks to go ahead

In view of recent tragic events in Paris, representatives of the 196 countries including many heads of state will be…

Measurable benefits of meditation

For centuries meditation has been a staple practice in many religions as well as a popular topic of debate among…

Technology Snippets

Trouble at TalkTalk Three people have been arrested in connection with the TalkTalk cyber hack where up to 1.2 million…

Can all of us keep to the golden temperature target?

  As we set our sights on the golden climate temperature target thought to prevent the most dangerous effects of…

Multimedia understanding for medical trials

Researchers from The University of York in collaboration with the Hull York Medical School will investigate how the use of…

WHO urges faster treatment for HIV

THE HIV virus targets the immune system leaving an infected individual vulnerable to all kinds of illnesses. A cold, fought…

Biohackers: are they friends or foes?

As defined by Wikipedia, biohacking is “the practice of engaging in biology with the hacker ethic”. Some moral values and…

Our young home is unusually metal-rich

The invention of the telescope allowed man to view the millions of stars and planets spread throughout the universe, sparking…

Summer of sunshine and sunstroke

Feeling hot and bothered or enjoying the tan? Why is it so warm?

19-Year Old, Boyan Slat, masterminds Ocean Cleanup

Every year about 8 million tons of plastic enter the ocean. Most of it degrades into tiny fractions that poison…

Red, amber, green chemistry

A group of researchers at the University of York have developed a toolkit which measures the green-ness of chemical reactions using a traffic light system