Derwent clocks highest voter turnout in college elections

Image: DS Pugh

Derwent received the highest turnout at the recent round of college JCRC and CSA elections. The results confirm that Derwent had the highest turnout with 40.2 per cent of students casting their ballots, followed by Vanbrugh with 30.6 per cent and Halifax in third with 25 per cent. The colleges with the poorest voter turnouts were Alcuin, with 13 per cent, and Constantine, with just 9.9 per cent of students casting a vote.

Dr Oleg Lisagor, Head of Halifax College, pledged that if Halifax achieved the second highest voter turnout result he would host a college RAG fundraising event next term in full drag. Sadly the valiant efforts of the Halifax team were not enough to push the college into second place, and Dr Lisagor narrowly avoided donning his heels and false eyelashes for charity.

The college elections finished with triumph for some, but the results betray a disappointing voter turnout and worrying gaps in committees as some important officer roles are left vacant. Committee hopefuls exhausted their printing credits and stocks of cardboard in campaigning for college elections, and their efforts culminated last week with the election results. Somewhat predictably voter turnout among students was reasonably low.

Perhaps poor voter turnout in some colleges can account for the fact that committees have notice-able gaps in representation, some-times even lacking crucial members of the executive team. Several positions have roles open for more than one person but are still vacant. In these cases it is unclear whether candidates for those roles simply weren’t forthcoming, or whether the voters decided to reopen nominations in the absence of suitable representatives.

Derwent again performed the best overall in terms of college roles filled, with the incoming committee leaving only the position of BAME representative unoccupied. Halifax and James left only five and four roles with no one to fill them respectively. The two colleges with the lowest voter turnout, Constantine and Alcuin, both have 11 roles unoccupied.

Despite coming middle of the pack in voter turnout, Goodricke and Langwith actually performed worst in terms of the completeness of their committee, leaving respectively 13 and 14 positions without a single representative. The case is particularly concerning when one looks at the incoming committee for Langwith, as of the seven welfare roles available not a single one has been filled, potentially leaving Langwith in a vulnerable position without a fully functional network of support for its students.

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