London Fashion Week Men’s SS18: Day 2

St James’ Show

An undisputed highlight of the LFWM line up was most certainly St James’ show. The quintessentially British event was a harking reminder of the great in great Britain’s menswear whilst remaining firmly in the present. The open-air presentation could be thought to be a modern amphitheatre-like experience of menswear. The strength of the show came in the unity of designers from Jermyn Street. The unity allowed from a extensiveness of time from contemporary brands alike Norwegian Rain to heritage classics alike New and Lingwood. To further the notion of unity and extensity, a clear transition in formality and purpose was adopted throughout the show. In the case of the former, formality levels were toned down initially with swimwear making the debut, which progressed throughout the show into suits. However, in the latter, this can be noted with the uses of materials and textures, with linens moving onwards to velvets. Nevertheless, St James proved what LFWM is all about – being the epitome of menswear.

 

Blood Brother

An annual, yet unusual, revival of the nineties occurred this season at Blood Brother’s presentation. The echoes from the DJ made evident a strong presence of menswear amongst the presentation, and a strong presence was certainly delivered. Nostalgia for the nineties was not confined to the clothing itself, but across the presentation as a whole; whether this be music, the construction of the presentation or the heavy use of recently outdated technology. Visuals played a key part in the Blood Brother’s presentation, with supercars and technology having a heavy dominance. However, the brilliance of the presentation was the timeframe it seemed to exist within – one could never clearly decipher whether it was employed for nostalgic purpose or prudent.

 

Daniel Fletcher

A seemingly playful and carefully cool presentation, tucked away in a pocket of Shoreditch reminded the humble onlooker at the genius of Fletcher. The general thematic imagery that remained in the forefront of the collection from first impression was the use of nostalgic athleticism. The presentation had models presented upon nineties P.E.-like crashmats, with the backdrop adopted perfectly for the general athleticism of the show. However, upon further inspection, it became prominent that there was a underlining commentary within the background of the presentation. Models wore “OUT” caps in Fletcher’s political commentary upon the recent general election. However, Fletcher did not limit himself to commentary solely within a political format. The SS18 was undeniably Fletcher’s most diverse forthcoming to date, with the designer aiming to reflect upon what it means to be young and British in the current socio-economic climate, as well as existing in fashion. Nevertheless, Fletcher reminds us of his individualist yet all-encompassing approach – levels of formality were contrasted yet easily blended to produce a near perfect collection acting as a social commentary.

 

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