Tory cuts: putting politics before the NHS

The Tories are neglecting the needs of the people and presiding over the destruction of the NHS for political gain

Image: NHS Confederation

The NHS was born out of crisis; established during the aftermath of the second world war. It aimed to respond to the increasing casualties and medical attention needed by the general public. Its inherent goal is to provide healthcare to all with no cost. However, in this reign of Tory monopoly in recent years, it looks as if the NHS is going to die from a crisis: a crisis which could be very easily prevented.

It seems, here, that we have become the creators of our own destruction. As we modernise and become medical experts, our lives are increasing in longevity. But with this increasing life expectancy, more health problems are created. The dominating problems to curse our era are cancer, obesity, and old age related diseases, not the aftermath of warfare. The NHS therefore is straining under the pressure, not just from cuts in funding but also due to the increasing size of our population, which goes in hand with more people experiencing problems that need medical care. Moreover, it is the self-centred interests of the Tories which are providing the tools for our destruction.

The Conservatives see it as in their own interests to destroy the NHS. After all, it was not their creation and they cannot take any responsibility for it. They can blame it on the Labour party who established it so many years ago. It seems to me that this provides some reasoning for their reluctance to give emergency funding in a winter of crisis which we seem to face every year.

I could reel off statistic after statistic, but I do not need to as most people know that the NHS is crumbling beneath our fingertips. This year alone has seen record numbers of cancellations in operations, including life changing ones for cancer treatment and birth complications. But this is not enough evidence to suggest the need for granting emergency funding for the Tory party, who are so enveloped in their self-serving bubbles that the needs of ordinary people do not even cross their minds. It’s all about sticking to the budget, minimising spending, and stabilising our economy. The health of the people seems to get disregarded for the progression of their manifesto.

It seems that to forget NHS funding; more hospitals are going to have to close and more deaths are going to have to occur. The Tories have even managed to bring xenophobia into the NHS crisis. Jeremy Hunt claims that the NHS would be improved with more UK trained doctors: “Is it right to import doctors from poorer countries that need them, while turning away bright home graduates desperate to study Medicine?” It seems to me, he is fostering underlying xenophobia to promote the downfall of the NHS and increase British nationalism. Hillary Benn has spoken out about Hunt and the general decline of the NHS. In his words, “when my father was dying, almost all who helped care for him were born outside of the UK. Who will look after us in the future?” The question still remains.

Some take the NHS for granted, they turn up to A&E with a cold whilst patients with serious diseases are waiting to be seen. Some voluntarily clog up the emergency services in their Saturday night escapades of binge drinking. Some people depend on the emergency services, and cannot afford the abuse of the NHS which continues. Abuse of our healthcare, therefore, can be attributed to both public and governmental actions. But more often than not, the government are fundamentally to blame in cutting funding to something so essential to daily life here in the UK.

The NHS, something Britain is proud of and something that is so universally valued could be at risk of destruction in the near future if funding needed to provide more beds, more operations and more care is not given. It should be something simple and unquestionable when the public’s health is at risk.

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