TV Review: Endeavour – Series 3 Episode 4: ‘Coda’

The latest series of Endeavour came to a close this week and there wasn’t a tiger in sight as Morse and Joan Thursday found themselves in the middle of a bank raid. reviews


Image: ITV

Image: ITV

This week’s episode started with the death of a local crime boss and followed the dealings of those determined to fill the power vacuum that he left behind. It was quite a neat little story with enough action and suspense to warrant its position as the final episode in the series, though the exact links between the murder of a man outside the bank and the gang itself seem at best sketchy. Similarly, I felt more could have been made of the tip off from one of the members of the gang; perhaps the anonymity there wasn’t as important as the character had only been marginal to begin with.

One cannot fault the production values of the bank robbery scene though. There was certainly a suitable amount of tension and anguish on offer to the abiding viewer. Even the usually feeble and stilted WPC Trewlove came out of this scene well, as it was revealed that she had been driving the bus that should have let some of the robbers get away with their hostages. The word “badass” is perhaps not the right word to use here, but the scene finally showed that the character is capable of more than a few poorly delivered lines. Here’s hoping that this is built upon next series.

Endeavour’s relationship with Joan Thursday is something that I have commented on briefly before. It’s an odd one. There’s never really been anything more said between them and their relationship was very much pushed to the side-lines in series two as Morse pursued his neighbour, Monica. This series, the young Miss Thursday has very much earned her way back into our young detective’s favour as they share in the concerns over her father’s health. Alas, to go from this to anything more has always been problematic and carries some sort of inevitable failure; we know full well that Morse lives and dies as a bachelor, so any relationship is doomed. Indeed, no sooner had the two been clinging to each other in the vault under the bank than Joan was running away from home due to the stress of the previous day’s events, breaking poor Endeavour’s heart in the process. As Felix Lormier, Morse’s old tutor at Oxford, so aptly put it this week: Morse has always had a weakness for the fairer sex.

With that Endeavour came to an end for another series. Thursday’s life remains, as it has been all series, on the line, as one ponders as to whether his statement to the robbers was correct and that he really only has three weeks to live. Whether it’s three weeks or a little longer, it’s clear that his demise is coming and that it will probably have a huge effect on young Morse, helping to shape the man we know that he becomes.

For me it’s probably the last Colin Dexter based review I will do as who knows where I will be when they air the next series of this or recommission Lewis “unexpectedly”. Hopefully it won’t take them two years to produce four more episodes, but it would be a shame to let the very high production values slip for the sake of speed. Whatever happens, whenever it happens, Endeavour has been a pleasure to review.


  1. 30 Jan ’16 at 6:06 am

    Patrick lynam

    Revue is not worth reading.

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  2. An excellent revue. Clear, concise and delving on all of the relevant details concerning the young Endeavour.

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  3. Will there be another series?

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  4. Is the Endeavour script writer, by any chance American?? I noticed a couple of ‘Americanisms’ seemed to have crept in to characters’ speech – e.g. Bright refers to a period of leave as a ‘furlough’ and Thursday ends at least one remark using ‘is all’ rather than ‘that’s all’. (e.g. something like ‘I thought it might be good for you, is all’ Were both these stalwart officers members of Nu Yawk’s Finest in their youth, by any chance?? :-)

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  5. Bright’s use of “furlough” is quite correct. It was in use in the Army as an alternative to “leave” during his time as a subaltern in India in 1935 (see Series 3, Episode 3, “Prey”)

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  6. 15 Jul ’16 at 2:56 am

    Dawn of Pendraig

    Where did Thursday’s son head off too? “Don’t volunteer for anything.” What did I miss?

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