Prospective home students to face difficulty entering York through clearing

Prospective home and EU students hoping to attend the University of York starting in October 2010 through clearing will face difficulty entering the majority of courses.

For those who fail to achieve the A-level results necessary to fulfil their conditional offers at their first choice university, the University of York will be a difficult institution to enter through the UCAS system if it was not their second choice.

Midwifery, Chemistry, Social Work, Biochemistry, Medicine, Psychology, and Theatre, Film, and Television degree courses were already completely full before A-level results were handed out this morning.

The Admissions Tutor for York Law School has said that “law programmes tend to be quite heavily oversubscribed, so this isn’t unusual.

It has been made apparent that exceptions are sometimes made for international students hoping to study at York. Places on the majority of courses are available for ‘Overseas’ students but not those from the EU, including Home students. While Overseas students pay an estimated three times more for their tuition at York than Home students (between £11,300 and £14,850), the number of places available for them is restricted only by the capacity of university facilities rather than by law, as Home places are. Institutions face fines, however, if they over-recruit students.

Home students may still find vacancies on Physics, Archaeology, Educational Studies, Social Policy, Environment, History of Art and some Nursing courses as of today through clearing.

Whilst national sources urge applicants to remain optimistic, maintaining that ‘high achievers’ may gain a place in institutions where spaces are purposely set aside before ‘Results Day’ for clearing students, Nick Pears, Admissions Tutor for the Computer Science Department has told Nouse about the way clearing works at York.

“Departments do not set aside spaces for clearing – rather, they hope to fill their spaces completely with students when they see the A-level results come through on Monday. They may choose to relax slightly the conditions of their offer to some students in order to achieve this. If they cannot fill their quota of places completely, then these unfilled places go through to clearing.

“Those departments that are full or feel that they are very close to that (because there is always some uncertainty with late results and so on), will not be advertising in clearing. However, those that need students to fill their places, will be listed on University web pages and elsewhere.”

Andrea Key, of the History Department has noted: “Last year we had approximately 1,786 applicants for 245 places which will give you an indication as to why we do not keep places aside for clearing.”

National figures have revealed that while 48,000 students entered university via clearing last year yet around 130,000 did not enter Higher Education. Those facing clearing this year may have to alter the course that they will be studying in order to gain a place at a particular institution.

Prospective students have been advised not to panic, as help will be available from the UCAS results helpline.

Remaining vacancies for degree courses at the University of York can be found at
http://clearing.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun/clv02/cl_search10/StateId/Q2eJf3omJJq561Q0uhA7HNByQPzBE-UE6s/HAHTpage/cl_search.Hsresults.run?cboCourse=-&cboInst=Y50&cboRegion=0&cboLevel=0&stype=H&Submit=search&scotSearch=0

4 comments

  1. “Midwifery, Chemistry, Social Work, Biochemistry, Medicine, Psychology, and Theatre, Film, and Television degree courses were already completely full before A-level results were handed out this morning.

    The Admissions Tutor for York Law School has said that “law programmes tend to be quite heavily oversubscribed, so this isn’t unusual.” ”

    Why did you get a quote from the Law School when Law wasn’t mentioned as a course that was full?

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  2. 19 Aug ’10 at 5:14 pm

    Jonathan from Spotify

    “but not those from the EU, including Home students”

    All EU students are considered to be Home students. That sentence should read “including UK students.”

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  3. Or “but not Home students, including students from the EU.”

    Pedantry over, I am off to ruin peoples’ playlists.

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  4. Is Roberta with you?

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