The Viking

Søren Bach originally started his career as a hairdresser. After 20 years of becoming more and more experimental and profficent with hair, he decided to make the transition to millinery, graduating from the RCA in 2007

Søren Bach originally started his career as a hairdresser. After 20 years of becoming more and more experimental and proficient with hair, he decided to make the transition to millinery, graduating from the RCA in 2007. His work has already featured in Russian and British Vogue, Dazed & Confused and POP. Bach is still relatively unknown to those not in the fashion world, but to those in the know, he is considered one of the most innovative milliners of our time. Back spoke to use about his controversial use of fur and his newest collection, which showed at Copenhagen Fashion Week, his hometown.

What was your inspiration for this collection?
My inspiration was all about the Russian Rose from Russian scarves. Russian embroidery, boot carving and dresses all played a part. I’ve looked at the traditional skills of wood carving and have put this together with my own technique. It was kind of an older technique meeting a newer style.

Does this mean you physically craft each piece before sending the item to the manufacturer?
Yes, I did everything by hand, including the dyeing which is seen on some of the pieces. One piece would be cut flat then the colour added with the surroundings.

How long does it take you to produce a piece?

A long time. Some pieces can take a week, whereas some can take up to a month. However, they are show pieces and are for the richer clients. Each aims to give satisfaction to the clients.

Where else do your pieces appear?
They are very popular with exhibitions and also for shoots and spreads.

You do use fur to produce your pieces. Do you ever face any hostility from industry insiders?
I haven’t had any problems really, apart from a few magazines who have called and asked if I produce anything that is not made of fur. It has led to a few refusals from magazines, but hopefully not because they dislike the pieces themselves.

If you could pick one person to wear your designs in the public eye, who would it be?
It must be someone like the Icelandic Bjork. She would be a good person for it.

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