University criticised for allowing student to incur a personal debt of over £2,000 for campus event

The 13:3 concert, the first to be held in Central Hall for 20 years, led to a £2,000 personal loss [Photo: Sam Newsome]

The 13:3 concert, the first to be held in Central Hall for 20 years, led to a £2,000 personal loss [Photo: Sam Newsome]

The University has been criticised this week for allowing a third-year student, Jason Rose, to organise and hold an event in Central Hall from which he made a personal loss of over £2,000.

Rose was allowed to invest £4,400 of his own money into the event held last Saturday, named 13:3, which was endorsed by the Christian Union.

The money covered the costs of hiring the band, equipment, porters and duty managers, which are required by the University for health and safety reasons.

However, while the University communicated with Rose regarding health and safety issues, and the apt provision of sufficient funds to cover the University costs, he did not have to go through any procedures or checks to ensure the event would be financially viable and that he would be protected from losing such a considerable sum of his own money.

“It’s unacceptable that a student has been allowed to take on thousands of pounds worth of liability in a campus venue with no checks or balances put in place.”

Ben Humphrys,
YUSU Welfare Officer

Rose’s consequent loss has caused concern among some who have viewed this as the University prioritising profit over student welfare.

For the event, starring the renowned Christian band, ‘The Gentlemen’, Rose needed to sell 650 tickets or more to break even, but on the night only sold around 200 tickets.

Rose stated that the University had been “very helpful in organising the event and communicating with [him] about all sorts of issues”, and that they have gone “far beyond the call of duty in supporting the event”.
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However, there have been questions over whether the University’s role should be more personal and supportive of the individual student rather than the event as a whole.

Ben Humphrys, YUSU Welfare Officer commented: “This is a prime example of the University failing in its duty of care; it’s unacceptable that a student has been allowed to take on thousands of pounds worth of liability in a campus venue with no checks or balances put in place.”

He continued to state: “In recognising this failure of process, I expect the University to waive any sum owed to it for the event and immediately implement a review of the system to prevent this happening again. YUSU already protects individuals and societies who run events through us around campus; if the University can’t offer the same protection they should ensure that we’re involved, or at least that some safeguards are in place, before negligently signing off on an event.”

Jon Greenwood, Head of Financial Services, stated that such an event is “taken at the student’s own risk.”

He continued: “All that is required is an event request form, which is then coordinated through health and safety. Our role is just to act as space managers, we don’t really do anymore than that. We probably ought to be allowed to do more, and get more involved with the students or colleges who run these events. Especially since he isn’t using the bar, we haven‘t really been involved in Jason Rose’s event at all.”

Lewis Bretts, YUSU Democracy and Services Officer, also voiced his concern that the University has allowed Rose to get into such a financially awkward situation, stating: “If he had organised the event through YUSU, we would have offered support and advice based more around personal student welfare, making him go through procedures beforehand to ensure he didn’t make such a considerable personal loss. I would hope that the University has similar standards and procedures, though it doesn’t appear that any of these took place.”

Bretts continued: “It’s awful that the University has allowed him to get into such a situation. Even though it isn’t a YUSU event, I have personally offered Jason any assistance he wants. I would always hope that the University would take all necessary steps to protect students, though unfortunately this doesn’t seem to be the case.”

However, Rose claims that he “tried to talk to YUSU but they didn’t help”, and that he does not believe the University “could have done anything futher to support the ticket sales”.

Nonetheless, despite the loss incurred, Rose still remained positive about the event, commenting: “It really was a great event – the sound quality was amazing and everything ran very smoothly. It was a success in that we proved what a great venue Central Hall can be for the future.”

“The problem is that it’s always going to be difficult to sell tickets [for] these bigger events. I still believe it was worth all the work I put in.”

The event was the first gig held in Central Hall since the 1980s, when the University banned it from being used as a concert venue following structural concerns that crowds jumping up and down in Central Hall were causing its foundations to sink into the lake.

31 comments

  1. No, its the not the Universities fault.

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  2. This is a nonsense story. If Mr Rose has the resources, financial and otherwise, to invest into staging this kind of event, which inherently means risking personal loss in pursuit of profit or whatever else he seeks to gain, then good luck to him. He probably had a fair idea he would make a loss but if he wants to make that sacrifice then it’s not the University’s place to stand in his way.

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  3. I have to say that I have no sympathy for Mr. Rose (although he doesn’t seem to be bothered by it all). As other commenteds have said, if he has the organisational skills to hire a band, central hall, and all the other things that go into this; he should be able to work out whether his financial investment is likely to see a return. It seems that the story here is that unfortunately, he didn’t break even, and lost lots of money. If he booked a decent artist he might have made a hefty profit. I really don’t see what the big story is here, apart from “student invests, loses money”. Poor bugger.

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  4. 16 Mar ’10 at 8:49 pm

    General Nicholas Alexander

    Surely this is quite simple.

    Whoever was going to benefit from the profit of this gig (had it in fact broken even) should front the loss. I’m not sure who this was but it was likely either the CU or Jason Rose himself.

    It really is as simple as that.

    ~J – please advise.

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  5. The proceeds were going to charity – I’m fronting the loss and I am bothered about making the loss but circumstances were stacked against me. It’s worth pointing out that last June, when I first organised the event, some of these situations weren’t known about. It’s also worth pointing out that the Gentlemen played Durham and Loughborough (and other) SU balls and made #1 on the URY charts in October so qualify as “a decent artist”.

    And as I stated in the story itself; the event was a massive success in the fact that it went ahead, had support from every aspect of the university, got full health and safety permission for every aspect, had the best lighting and sound at any university event in history – and Central Hall is so ****** amazing; by far the best venue in York – and nobody died, the building didn’t fall into the lake and there’s no lawsuit on the table… Whilst it made a financial loss, the event showed that Central Hall gigs can be done and done properly – and that they’re worth doing. It just also shows that it’s probably only worth doing for massive events like Freshers Ball and the like!

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  6. The CU was never going to bear the brunt of the loss. They were merely behind Jason in order to give the event some ‘official’ backing so that it didn’t just look like Jason Rose taking on the world. He was always aware of the potential loss, but chose to continue with the event anyway. All the people I’ve spoken to who went really enjoyed themselves, and said that it was a very well-run gig. It’s a shame fewer people went, but that was down to poor advertising, and being forced to choose a bad date (Dick Whittington, G&S Society, CHMS, Fusion and all the other Central Hall events this term left only Week 9 Saturday, as far as I’m aware, as a potential date for the gig). Good luck to Dan Walker next year when he capitalises on his promise to get more gigs in Central Hall!

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  7. 17 Mar ’10 at 2:52 pm

    What me Worry?

    This is ridiculous! I hate to laugh at the misery of a fellow human being but this story is so absurd! A Christian Rock concert in central hall? on the election night? with 750 tickets needed to be sold? You don’t need to be Brian Epstein to realise its hardly viable. I look foward to Jason’s next zany financial antics:
    1.Donating money to a fraudulent monorail project to connect campus with Hes East.
    2. Financing a four masted sailing vessel to discover “El Dorado” and to bring back its fabulous wealth for the glory of YUSU
    3. Giving twenty pence to smack addict who earnestly assured him it was needed for a bus fare

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  8. To be fair, we are all 18+ and we are all capable of judging how best to spend our money. If I wanted to spend my entire student loan on a gig/business/clothes then I’m more than welcome to, but being an adult I have to then take responsibility for my actions when I can’t pay rent/eat/go out. Maybe Jason should too. It’s really common sense and I don’t understand why he’s expecting the university to spoon feed him

    Also maybe he should have reconsidered the whole business venture?

    – The flyers I saw for it were pretty shabby and didn’t make it look exciting at all. Which probs wasted a large chunk of your budget and generally didn’t help with ticket sales.
    – Election night was on..
    – Christian rock is all well and good for some but it’s not marketable, it’s not going to get £4k worth of ticket sales: I’m sorry to say. No matter how ~great~ your band are.
    – Not once did it appear in a YUSU email or any other mass email?
    – General advertising (large posters on campus etc etc) was lacking only decreasing general awareness.

    “I am bothered about making the loss but circumstances were stacked against me”

    It’s your duty as primary investor to make sure that the odds aren’t stacked against you, surely?

    “had the best lighting and sound at any university event in history ”

    lol maybe it’s this arrogant attitude that got you a £2k loss in the first place…

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  9. First of all, Jason has never complained about this in the first place, so some of the above criticism is a bit unfair. In any case, he’s a science student in a top university; ipso facto his future earning potential will be higher than average. An extra £2k is not going to be a massive problem when he’ll have to start repaying his student debt.

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  10. George: read the comment above by ~J, he seems as if he is complaining.

    When we all graduate we’re all going to have higher than average salaries, but it doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll all be running to our bank begging for debts amounting to £2k any time soon?

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  11. How was I complaining? And in response to the various points above:

    “It’s really common sense and I don’t understand why he’s expecting the university to spoon feed him”: I never was. I haven’t made any comment suggesting that I was, I don’t blame the university for the loss and I’m not seeking any covering of the loss. How is it spoon feeding?

    “Also maybe he should have reconsidered the whole business venture?” It wasn’t a business venture. It was a gig made for the purposes of having a gig – and all profits would have gone to charity because I didn’t want it to look like a business venture. Not all of us are trying to wring money out of students – some of us just want a good music event in Central Hall.

    “The flyers I saw for it were pretty shabby and didn’t make it look exciting at all. Which probs wasted a large chunk of your budget and generally didn’t help with ticket sales.” Dunno, I haven’t seen many better flyers for previous events – haven’t seen any flyers for Viking Raid or Access All Areas, for Fusion etc. Granted that more publicity would have been better but without much support, there’s a limit to the ability. And the 3,000 double-sided colour flyers cost me £70 so I’m not sure it’s “a large chunk of the budget” at all..!

    “Election night was on.” Yes. Yes it was.
    “Christian rock is all well and good for some but it’s not marketable, it’s not going to get £4k worth of ticket sales: I’m sorry to say. No matter how ~great~ your band are.” Interesting because the Gentlemen helped Durham and Loughborough make about £20,000+ on their summer balls. But obviously you’re correct – the media marketing of it as “Christian Rock” didn’t help.

    “Not once did it appear in a YUSU email or any other mass email?” I was not allowed to put it in any mass email or advertise through YUSU.

    “General advertising (large posters on campus etc etc) was lacking only decreasing general awareness.” A) That’s not decreasing awareness – it’s just not adding to it. B) Where would you suggest I had put it?

    “It’s your duty as primary investor to make sure that the odds aren’t stacked against you, surely?” Perhaps, but sometimes events are out of the hands of myself, even if I have more control than other people

    ” “had the best lighting and sound at any university event in history” lol maybe it’s this arrogant attitude that got you a £2k loss in the first place”: To rephrase to mean what I was trying to say – ‘had the best lighting and sound at any University of York event in history’. I bought the best equipment and it was the best. I knew it would cost more and that it wouldn’t affect ticket sales but as I said before, I cared more about putting on an amazing event than raising money. It was the first gig in Central Hall and I wanted to push the venue to its limit. It passed the test.

    Again; I could probably have found a few other ways to market the event but I think that flyers in every kitchen (and dining room, on 4 separate days) on campus and under 600 doors would qualify as a reasonable amount of publicity. It’s more than Big D or Fusion gets. But without YUSU backing, I couldn’t have stretched much further.

    And ultimately I knew that there were risks and I worked to minimise them. I put effort into the management and running of the event moreso than the publicity as I wanted to ensure that it ran well and it did indeed run well. The bands enjoyed it, the people there enjoyed it and Central Hall was incredible (and I enjoyed it) so I’m satisfied overall..?!

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  12. Daniella, Jason is of course concerned (who wouldn’t be) but to me it doesn’t look as if he’s complaining to anyone. As for the extra debt, to be honest I’d still much rather be in Jason’s position than graduate with a slightly lower debt and a degree of little academic/market value.

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  13. At least Jason got up and did something. In my opinion YUSU Events have been fairly poor in my time at York. The only notable *excellent* event by YUSU in my opinion was Summer Ball 2008 with Alphabeat. The best college event has to be Big D with Pendulum & Chesney.

    While AAA is ok, it happens once a year… now YUSU have The Courtyard, we should be pushing for bigger and better events. L/N/028 could be awesome if a little money was spent to get good equipment and a decent DJ to come to CO2.

    Jason should be congratulated for showing the bravery to put on an event that YUSU won’t come close to doing.

    Also, on the note of Election Night, was it just me that felt that the night just stopped at 1.50, only 20min after the President results… I think most people would have been up for a longer event, or indeed to start earlier to leave time for an afterparty.

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  14. “Interesting because the Gentlemen helped Durham and Loughborough make about £20,000+ on their summer balls.”

    To be fair people probably turned up for the summer ball as opposed to the act? When ever I’ve seen events like that (proms, winter balls, freshers balls) it’s more for the dressing up/meal/experience and the music is just secondary, they may have played at successful events but that does not necessarily mean they create the success? I can understand why you think that but…I think the logic behind it is a bit flawed.

    “And the 3,000 double-sided colour flyers cost me £70 so I’m not sure it’s “a large chunk of the budget” at all..!”

    My fault for assuming printing was v.v.v. expensive ! But to be fair they did look..shabby. Which would make me worry about the event overall, but this is a female consumer so maybe it’s different for males/people who aren’t so pedantic.

    ““General advertising (large posters on campus etc etc) was lacking only decreasing general awareness.” A) That’s not decreasing awareness – it’s just not adding to it. B) Where would you suggest I had put it?”

    anywhere- Vanbrugh? look at the recent elections campaigns, people had MASSIVE banners everywhere. Whilst it’s a bit of a lame tactic size does make an impact and would have possibly raised more awareness therefore resulted in more ticket sales..

    “It’s more than Big D or Fusion gets.”

    I have no idea what big D is. But Fusion would always get sales because it’s the type of thing people want to see, also their friends are involved so it’s more ‘communal’ than a random band coming in and performing, therefore there are more ticket sales. Also facebook publicity (as pathetic as it sounds) really does have an impact and I think that fusion had the advantage there. Things like viking raid will ALWAYS sell out because it’s essentially a discounted night out, with tshirts, so it’s hardly a fair comparison to something quite new (as you did) and less ‘studenty’.

    I mean fair play if you arranged it all yourself etc it’s an impressive feat, especially if you managed to get the sounding/lighting correct too. I’m not saying it was a bad night I just don’t understand why the article is implying that the uni are some how to blame for your problem? Like they’re running what is a business (as well as a uni) so they’re not really going to care..to me it seems naive to think that they would care about your finances…as the article has sort of implied. It’s not like they screwed you over or ended up changing their price to £x amount more per hour it was just a mesh of a situation so no one can really be held accountable apart from the student body’s lack of interest..

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  15. “I have no idea what big D is.”

    That cuts deep, Daniella. Deep.

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  16. “It was a gig made for the purposes of having a gig”. My brain wants me to reply in two different ways, so I’m going to…

    1) From the way I see it, the gig was a success and Jason was so up for it that he was willing to pay £2000 more than anybody else for the gig. There is nothing wrong with this.

    2) Ever heard of Fibbers? The Duchess? Leeds? Sheffield? To be honest, you could probably go anywhere in the UK or even Europe for a concert if you want one, and they’ll all be cheaper than £2000. Next time you want a gig, remember what I have told you!

    Seriously though, I understand why you did it. I just don’t think you were the right person to be doing it. As has been said, you’re a science student, not a buisiness man.

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  17. Firstly, I surprisingly agree with Matt – despite ample events, the Chesney Big D was the best college event and the Alphabeat Summer Ball was the best event overall. And whilst Paul makes the excellent point that there are other events – there aren’t any BIG events in York and I wasn’t just wanting to attend one. Otherwise I’d have just attended the Stornaway gig that I’m helping to run with URY. Talking of which, I need to pay them today. But I wanted to get a gig in Central Hall to cut around all the crap of “we’ll do one next year”. There’s been one in Central Hall now – have 3 next year. Just do it.

    “maybe it’s different for males/people who aren’t so pedantic” – I’m perhaps the most pedantic person at the university but I’m not sure that bad grammar on a flyer would stop me from wanting to go to the event itself. It’s the content that’s more important – and the level of advertising, of course.

    “Vanbrugh? look at the recent elections campaigns, people had MASSIVE banners everywhere.” I agree that it would have had a bigger impact but unfortunately election postering rules are different to other postering rules. An event is not allowed to poster anywhere that hasn’t had permission given to it – you can book out Vanbrugh stalls if they hadn’t already been booked out but otherwise you’re limited to begging for permission for areas that aren’t allowed or solely using the shockingly bad plastic postering cases.

    “It’s an impressive feat, especially if you managed to get the sounding/lighting correct too. I’m not saying it was a bad night I just don’t understand why the article is implying that the uni are some how to blame for your problem?” And I don’t understand either; hence my decision to reply on here.

    “I have no idea what Big D is.” And that is an inherent problem to this discussion. I have helped at Woodstock, Big D, Battle of the Bands, Access All Areas etc. and have attended significant numbers of Summer Balls and Fresher Balls. I’ve organised a decent number of successful events and attended less successful events. I know the event management system inside out and have even got a ‘special thanks to’ mention on programmes at two massive events. I’m not just a random student going into it blind! Big D is the biggest event of the year bar the two Balls so you’ll *definitely* hear about it, as with Woodstock. You’ll learn! And it’s an interesting marker that all of the 3rd years have complimented and the 1st years are criticising! I know the advertising wasn’t perfect but there’s a limit to what you can do alongside an Astrophysics degree, a YUSU Officership and actually running the event!

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  18. 18 Mar ’10 at 3:02 pm

    A. Politician

    Really positive to see central hall being used for gigs again. As mentioned in a comment above, nobody’s being sued, central hall is still intact and hopefully it can be used more extensively in the future.

    I must admit i’ve never heard of the band and didn’t see any advertising around campus which might explain the poor ticket sales. But getting punters into any campus event these days seems pretty tough – how many college events lose money?

    We’ve actually got some decent spaces for live music including JJ’s which is really underused given its the right kind of building for gigs. If individuals like Mr Rose can organise events like this by himself, isn’t it time our societies and union stepped up a gear? URY have hosted decent artists before and oxjam used to happen, but YUSU don’t organise musical entertainment apart from at balls.

    Maybe YUSU should support enterprising students who want to bring live music to the campus rather than ignore them. No mention in daily info, no mention in weekly email, no mention from officers.

    By cooperating with each other individuals, societies and the union could get huge audiences to gigs which could make york a stop on plenty of campus tours for up-and-coming (or hopelessly past it one-hit-wonders ) like other campus universities.

    Congrats to Mr Rose for actually having the initiative to organise your own event, it’s a shame it didn’t make a profit and its a shame it wasn’t supported by our union. I hope socs like URY and YSTV and bandsoc can all help out with advertising and support next time we have live new music on campus.

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  19. “Maybe YUSU should support enterprising students who want to bring live music to the campus rather than ignore them.”

    *sigh*, I’d have loved to.

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  20. 18 Mar ’10 at 4:48 pm

    Luke Malkin Lover

    *hugs*

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  21. “I have no idea what big D is.”

    That cuts deep, Daniella. Deep.”

    i’m sorry, what is it?

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  22. “And it’s an interesting marker that all of the 3rd years have complimented and the 1st years are criticising!”

    to be fair maybe first years expect more from a ‘gig’, like I think perhaps we’re too ambitious in the type of band (no offense I just hate Christian rock I’m sure it’s nice for Christians though) we’d expect from it, the type of atmosphere, etc. Also bearing in mind it seemed primarily aimed at first years (you said you campaigned heavily in kitchens, I’ve seen you campaign in kitchens I think in a suit + trainers?) or those living on campus..so maybe we’re more critical as we decided NOT to go whereas 3rd years would just be impressed that some one finally managed to get it going.

    The article does make you seem more like a crackhead who decided to do this rather than some one who actually had experience, so sorry for the utter lack of sympathy…It would have worked out with a more mainstream band but I know that a lot of people would have been put off with the Christian label instantly..

    Are you going to run any in the future? (Just curiosity you don’t have to answer)

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  23. “Are you going to run any in the future? (Just curiosity you don’t have to answer)”

    Obviously, I’m not Jason so don’t take my work for it but… I don’t see Jason organising another concert on campus. He’s already £2000 in debt from this one, he doesn’t need anymore! I think there will be more though. Jason has shown it can be done, and maybe now others will follow in his footsetps. Maybe the next guy to give it a shot can learn from Jason’s mistakes?

    And Big D is just a large Derwent event that takes place at the end of the year. It’s usually run around the same time as the Summer Ball, and although it’s not run in direct competition with the Summer Ball (I don’t think it is, anyway), there usually seems to be a lot of debate about which is the best and who will be attending what.

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  24. The whole YUSU should have helped out is starting to annoy me.

    #1 YUSU now has a trustee board who have to, among other duties, assess the financial risk of any venture and so I believe they would have turned this away (if the common sense of the officers hadn’t already done)

    #2 YUSU cannot really work with things CU related as they are not affiliated and therefore any sort of split financing is not allowed

    #3 The event was raising money for charity therefore it would be against Ultra Vires law for YUSU to put any money or provide any sort of financial fall back for the event should it make a loss

    I think it’s admirable that they are now trying to help Jason seek support and I am very surprised that the university allowed a student run event to occur without the backing of YUSU and that Ben’s arguments in this piece are spot on.
    Hats off to you Jason for getting events restarted in Central Hall but I don’t think it was the right one to start with.

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  25. 19 Mar ’10 at 10:52 am

    YUSU should help students

    YUSU exists to help students, so I believe it should have helped Jason. It has put its neck on the line with how it runs it own events and supports others so I don’t see why it couldn’t have helped Jason.

    Re #1 – Jason was budgeting break even at 54% capacity, which I believe is well within the YUSU figure of 66%. So in that sense, the budget was cautious, not risky. If the budget was ‘risky’ surely YUSU could have helped make it less so?

    Re #2 – The event was endorsed by the CU, not run by it. It really pisses me off when YUSU refuse to work with anyone who isn’t within their organisation. YUSU still has a legal duty to help and assist York students and their developmental opportunities, even if it is officially ‘external’ to YUSU.

    Re #3 – Arghhh there is no such law as ‘Ultra Vires law’. Yes, it would have been an ultra vires action for YUSU to finance the event in the same way it did with Woodstock for years but it still doesn’t negate YUSU’s lack of assistance in other areas.

    The phrase ‘ultra vires’ should not be used as a roadblock to YUSU offering help and support to students wanting to further their university experience. Surely YUSU would have wanted to see this event as a success as now any future event in CHall will have to be deemed as ‘risky’ and possibly subject to the wrath of the trustees.

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  26. 19 Mar ’10 at 12:57 pm

    Was in FUSION

    You win some, you lose some J-dog. Nobody said it was gonna be easy.

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  27. 19 Mar ’10 at 5:48 pm

    No-one in particular

    “I knew it would cost more and that it wouldn’t affect ticket sales but as I said before, I cared more about putting on an amazing event than raising money”

    1) Considering the proceeds were going to charity, surely the emphasis should have been more on raising money? I suppose every event is a trade-off between quality and profit but I think I would have concentrated more on profit.

    2) Not having a go at Jason here because he doesn’t seem to be complaining, but to those that are attributing blame to YUSU… If this was Jason’s attitude, it is his fault that the event did not make a profit (or didn’t make smaller losses), not YUSU’s.

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  28. Big D: is an event at the end of summer term with a large act (not of a dissimilar calibre to YUSU Balls bands) in Derwent Bar an another headline act in Langwith with both colleges cordoned off and a massive capacity. Prices are in the low £20s and all proceeds go to charity. They usually raise thousands of pounds and have a great event; as Matt and I earlier said, they had Pendulum and Chesney Hawkes as the two in our first year and it was a great night. Fairground rides, candy floss, other shizzle :P

    Running any in the future: I would like to – I ran one event for the sake of Christian music; obviously if I had just been trying to raise money for charity I would have gone with more mainstream bands – but I no longer have the funds necessary to underwrite such an event. If I were able to earn £5,000 over summer then I’m sure I’d do something more mainstream next year – or possibly a significantly smaller CU gig. There are a couple of cheaper and more local Christian bands that are really good and would be appropriate for a cheaper event in James Hall, JJs or somewhere… But I would love to help organise getting someone massive in Central Hall if I had any money left! :P It’s not likely to happen, though.

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  29. seriously want to go to big d just for the fairground rides..hahah!

    good luck if you do decide to, the article makes you seem a lot worse than you come across in comments?! good luck if you do though, it was an honorable cause and at least you can say you’ve organised something for the uni..

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  30. 22 Mar ’10 at 2:18 am

    Tony Richards

    Putting it on the same night as election night was always going to cause an issue. Two events on the same night (on campus) are generally a bad idea and should be avoided.

    It would be interesting to analyse this event and what went wrong with it because central hall could be a great venue to bring in bigger name acts at york, IF, we publicise it well in advance.

    One of the things I noticed when it came to the event Jason I saw very little publicity on it till you approached me in the corridor and attempted to sell me a ticket.

    If there is anything the recent election has taught us, £35 can go a long way to generating publicity if it’s done innovatively.

    Tough luck Jason it was a truly ambitious project. The first gig in central hall could set a precedence yet…….

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  31. Well the event was set up the previous June and election publicity swamped all other publicity. I know there were about 10 events during the election fortnight – how many of those did you know were going on? And thanks Daniella :)

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