Exciting new agreement reached between University of York and Tate Britain

The University of York History of Art Department has revealed this week it has entered into an important new partnership with the highly regarded art body, Tate Britain

The University of York History of Art Department has revealed this week that it has entered into an important new partnership with the highly regarded art body, Tate Britain.

The agreement means that every Spring Term, a curator from Tate Britain will take on a full teaching role within the department. In exchange, an Art Historian from the University will spend an equivalent amount of time working on research and exhibition projects for the institution.

In a statement regarding the new development, Professor Mark Hallet, Head of the History of Art Department, commented: “This is a wonderful opportunity for collaboration and exchange. It offers our MA students the chance to work with internationally renowned curators and for colleagues to pursue research in the world’s leading collection of British art.”

The University has had a growing relationship with Tate Britain for many years since the two institutions became involved in the Arts and Humanities Research project, ‘Court, Country, City: British Art 1660-1735’. However, this is the first time Tate Britain has entered into such a formalised accord with any University in the country.

Judith Nesbitt, Chief Curator at Tate Britain, said: “As a former University of York student, I am especially pleased to welcome the new staff exchange. It will provide an exciting opportunity to introduce works from the Tate Collection to new generations of art history students. In turn, the visiting scholars from York promise to bring valuable skills and insights into Tate.”

Staff and students have expressed their enthusiasm for the new links established with such a world renowned institution. Bethany Picken, a second-year History of Art student, stated: “This new relationship is really exciting and shows just how well respected the History of Art Department has become across the country. It’s such an amazing opportunity – it will definitely help broaden and enrich people’s interest in art beyond just our degree.”

Karen Hearn, curator of 16th and 17th Century British Art at the Tate Britain, will be the first expert to take part in the exchange, teaching ‘Painters and Painting in Tudor and Stewart England’.

In exchange, Dr Jason Edwards will be the first Art Historian from the University to work closely with Tate Britain. Dr Edwards main focus at the Tate will be on research relating to Victorian Sculpture.

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