Singles List

James Blunt – Goodbye My Lover

This third single from the ridiculously sucessful Back to Bedlam album is a far less typical or commercially pleasing affair. More understated than previous releases from the record, its touching words are moulded around an achingly raw partnership between bare piano melody and Blunt’s distinctive vocals. Don’t expect this one to top the charts though – practically everyone in the country already owns this album, and the song is certainly not as accessible as ‘last dance of the school disco’ favourite, You’re Beautiful

James Blunt – Goodbye My Lover

This third single from the ridiculously successful Back to Bedlam album is a far less typical or commercially pleasing affair. More understated than previous releases from the record, its touching words are moulded around an achingly raw partnership between bare piano melody and Blunt’s distinctive vocals. Don’t expect this one to top the charts though – practically everyone in the country already owns this album, and the song is certainly not as accessible as ‘last dance of the school disco’ favourite, You’re Beautiful.

Coldplay – Talk

Mr Paltrow and his backing band appear to have hopped into a time portal and ended up in the 80’s for this drab, synth filled offering, in which there is about as much emotion as your standard episode of Neighbours (accentuated due to the unfortunate decision to release this as the follow-up to the exceptional anthem Fix You). Not unlistenable, but instantly forgettable. You get the impression that Talk is destined to be relegated to the track listing of a least one ‘Drive Time Classics’ album in the months ahead. Come on boys, you can do better

Sigur Rós – Hoppipolla

It is no wonder that Sigur Rós are relatively little known in the UK, where Icelandic music begins, and indeed ends, with Bjork’s It’s Oh So Quiet. However, rest assured that the band’s critically acclaimed new album Takk should settle a few scores, especially this, the second single from the record. A whirlpool of Nordic post-rock bliss, Hoppipolla combines a full orchestral sound with a memorable piano riff and haunting, childlike vocals which pull on heartstrings you never knew you had. Blunt take note – THIS is how to do it.

Nizlopi – The JCB Song

When a song is labelled a favourite for Christmas number one, I don’t expect to like it, nor do I even expect to find it mildly amusing. This, however, I find offensive to any unsuspecting person who may have turned on the radio at the wrong time, or, unsuspecting, bought it for an insistent younger relative. Torture for the ears, and very possibly the worst record ever made.

Crazy Frog – Jingle Bells

I take it back.

Singles this week were reviewed by Music Editor Gemma Day

2 comments

  1. Mindless 80’s synths? Think you will find that is kraftwerk love, amongst the most influencial of 80s electro pioneers.. you failed to mention this.. don’t get me wrong I agree that coldplay are lukewarm poo but the music is stolen directly from computerliebe. Easy to knock Kraftwerk but have noticed that not many people have actually listened to them.. and I tell you they are proper good….

    Also… where Icelandic music begins, and indeed ends…. what rubbish! You plump for the stereotypical; the icelandic music scene is where it is happening! Reykjavík is a highly sought after musical capital- with many an amazing recording studio! Leaves, Mum, Elephant Poetry, Tenderfoot, Thirteen, Amina, Kimono all are established Icelandic artists with succesfull record deals… The boys just signed from Fat Cat to EMI for heaven’s sake- they are not unheard of! I have followed them for years since Agaetis.. as have many a persons! They, in my opinion, influenced Radiohead’s change of direction- Thom Yorke has even admitted this in interview! And the ballet score they cowrote with greenwood and co has given them a great deal of reputation in the arts world- the fact they can write scores for ballets or 48 piece orchestras is impressive considering they have only recently broached their twenties! Plumping for the Bjork comparison is too easy and not insightful!

    Nuff said.. I do agree with you on the whole though…

    Josef

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  2. Well hello….

    OK, first the Coldplay record: I can here synths of some description in the background there, and I didn’t even CONSIDER Kraftwerk when writing the review, if I HAD done, I would have mentioned how much I enjoy their music at the best of times. It’s just not a record that I enjoyed, background tones included, and I did overlook the Kraftwerk input, if that’s what it is. For that I apologise.

    On to Sigur Ros….pardon me for being persistent with this point, but I meant, when making the ‘It’s Oh So Quiet’ point, the British music scene as a WHOLE. Ask a room full of people to name an artist from Iceland, and I guarantee you 99% of them wiLL only have heard of Bjork. Ask the same people the question who wrote ‘We have a map of the Piano’ and I guarantee you that 100% of them will not know what the hell you’re on about. I love Sigur Ros, I went to see them this year in Bimingham and they blew me away – as I do Mum, who my boyfriend introduced me to 11 months ago, but when writing for Nouse I have to take into account the majority unfortunately; try and offer the masses more musical depth, rather than going on about what I know about a particular style or band.

    Thanks for the comments, and I appreciate that a few people will know a lot more about certain music scenes than others, but at least all the Nouse readers on campus know who Sigur Ros are now, hopefully spurring them on to look in to Leaves, Mum etc….

    Cheers Again,
    Your friendly Music Ed

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